Sex-differences in immune aging: are we missing half of the picture?

Neutrophils are the most abundant human white blood cell and constitute a first line of defense in the innate immune response. Neutrophils are short-lived cells, and thus the impact of organismal aging on neutrophil biology, especially as a function of biological sex, remains poorly understood. We have generated a multi-omic resource of mouse primary bone marrow neutrophil from young and old female and male mice, at the transcriptomic, metabolomic and lipidomic levels. We identified widespread regulation of neutrophil ‘omics’ landscapes with organismal aging and biological sex. In addition, we leveraged this data to predict functional differences, including changes in neutrophil responses to activation signals. To date, this dataset represents the largest multi-omics resource for neutrophils across sex and ages. This resource identifies neutrophil characteristics which could be targeted to improve immune responses as a function of sex and/or age.

New Non-hormonal Contraceptive Targets

These webinars, sponsored by the Society for the Study of Reproduction (SSR), Frontiers in Reproduction (FIR), and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, will focus on emerging technologies and approaches to male and female contraception.

Speakers:

Dr. Lonny R. Levin, Professor of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College

Read more about Dr. Levin’s Presentation

Title: On-demand nonhormonal male contraception via ADCY10 inhibition

Description: Fast-acting sAC inhibitors with slow off-rates can provide safe, pre-coital, on-demand contraception for men which is nonhormonal, orally available, easily tolerated, fast-acting, and readily reversible.

Dr. Celia Santi, Associate Professor of OBGYN, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis

Read more about Dr. Santi’s presentation!

Title: Targeting the sperm-specific K+ channel SLO3 for non-hormonal contraception.


Description: Identification of inhibitors of the sperm specific SLO3 K+ channel that can be developed into a non-hormonal class of female contraceptives that act by targeting sperm capacitation.

Developing New Methods for Testing, Studying, and Delivering Contraception

These webinars, sponsored by the Society for the Study of Reproduction (SSR), Frontiers in Reproduction (FIR), and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, will focus on emerging technologies and approaches to male and female contraception.

Speakers:

Dr. Jianjun Sun, Associate Professor, Department of Physiology & Neurobiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs

Read more about Dr. Sun’s Presentation

Title: Screening female contraceptive compounds using Drosophila ovulation model

Description: In my presentation, I will introduce the ovulation mechanism in Drosophila and describe the platform utilizing Drosophila ovulation to screen contraceptive compounds that can effectively inhibit follicle rupture.

Dr. Phil Santangelo, Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech University & Emory University

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Read more about Dr. Santangelo’s Presentation

Title: Intravaginal delivery of mRNA encoded contraceptive antibodies

Novel bidirectional pathways in the hypothalamic control of reproduction and metabolism

In this presentation I will be covering the novel pathways in which Kiss1 neurons participate in the bidirectional regulation of energy balance and reproduction. In particular, I will talk about novel transcription factors involved in this regulatory process and offer evidence supporting a role for Kiss1 neurons in the mediation of the reproductive and metabolic role of melanocortins.

Dr. Barfield, Dr. Wilkins, and the Laramie Foothills Bison Conservation Herd Project!

The Laramie Foothills Bison Conservation Project focuses on the ecologic and reproductive wellbeing of the bison herd at CSU. Today, we are talking to Dr. Jennifer Barfield and Dr. Kate Wilkins about what it takes to manage, breed, and conserve a bison herd. Tune in as we talk about the importance of bison in their habitat, the benefits of ART, the cultural importance behind this species, and why it takes a village to bring together this project. Enjoy!

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